GunVault


GunVault GV1000S

California DOJ Approved


This handgun safe, called the Minivault Standard, features a spring-release latching mechanism common throughout China’s industry of copied and recycled locking mechanism designs. This style of mechanism is inherently vulnerable, because its mechanical components move independently of the motor that actuates them; the motor’s gearing is not used to lock any part of this mechanism in place. As can be seen in the video, this locking mechanism is vulnerable to attack if the safe has extraneous holes allowing access to the mechanism. This safe was examined May 20, 2015.

GunVault GVB1000

California DOJ Approved


This handgun safe, called the Minivault Biometric, features the same spring-release mechanism found in the GV1000S. The main difference between the two safes is that this one has a fingerprint reader. Though it is a fancier, more expensive device, the GVB1000 is no more secure than the less expensive model; the mechanical components of the locking mechanism are accessible through holes in the side of the safe. This safe was examined February 23, 2016.

GunVault MV500

California DOJ Approved


This is a generic Chinese-made portable case identical to a product manufactured by Yiwu Ospon Intelligent Technology Co., Ltd. (model OS500-SDT). The device has more vulnerabilities to it than I exploit on video. For example, the rubber feet in the bottom of it can be removed, and I was able to reach in with coat-hanger wire to actuate the release. But this problem can be mitigated if the device is bolted down. As I show on video, the gap at the front opening into the latch-mechanism leaves this device accessible even if it’s bolted down. This safe was examined October 8, 2017.